70 mpg on one battery

I’d take one.  The VW Polo TDI.

It’s already for sale in Europe.  How about in the US?

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Live long and propser

Great news for my fellow Trekkers:

Leonard Nimoy isn’t through with Spock yet. The 76-year-old actor will don his famous pointy ears again to play the role in an upcoming “Star Trek” film due out Christmas 2008.

“This is really going to be a great movie. And I don’t say things like that lightly,” Nimoy told a gathering of 6,500 fans Thursday at Comic-Con, the nation’s largest pop-culture convention.

Zachary Quinto plays a younger Spock.

Why not truth friendly?

David Schraub has an interesting, angsty piece up about how to approach a “feminist friendly” defense in rape cases.

I have been perpetually intrigued by the question: How does a feminist defend himself against rape charges? While I have seen many (very justified) criticisms of a variety of common rape-defense tactics (slut shaming, “she was asking for it”, etc.), to date, I have never seen any examination or recommendation of what would constitute a morally acceptable defense against the accusation of rape.

While I appreciate his concern, if he’s looking for generic guidelines he needs to escape beyond the battle of the sexes and look at rape in general.  The “slut” and “asking for it” defense are never acceptable period regardless of the race or genders involved.

Men also can be rape victims.  Men and women both can be victimized by people of the same sex.  Why focus on “feminist-friendly” and shift to a more appropriate issue – the facts of the case.  Did the parties in question have sex?  Was it consensual?   If it wasn’t, the guilty party should be very severely punished for a very very long time.

The “crucify the woman” defense is unfortunate because it really doesn’t have anything to do with whether a rape occurred.  In a better world it would never be attempted.  Then again, in a better world people would never be falsely accused ether, and in a perfect world there would be no rape.